Session 2: In God’s Image

selfie-in-text-picYou’ve seen them everywhere. Everyone does it. Young, old, rich, and poor. All places, all activities, and all sorts of faces. It is the selfie.

When cameras were inserted into our phones and our phones became a necessary addition to our everyday lives, we had the opportunity to take pictures of anything at any time…or better put…pictures of us with various backgrounds behind us at any time.

The selfie is an interesting oddity. We take posed pictures of ourselves so that others might think something about us when they view our duck-faced self portraits on facebook or twitter. (Not everyone duck-faces, I realize. But I like to pick on those that do.)

In essence, we want others to think something is true about us based on the picture we take of ourselves. We desire that our image will communicate a message to the viewer.

In this week’s lesson, we are dealing with the creation of man in Genesis 1 and 2. The theological term that we are learning is, “The image of God.” The super smart people who use Latin phrases as they take their selfies would say, “The Imago Dei.”

IMG_2109
My duck-faced selfie. The “imago dei” in me is cringing.

The main point of this lesson is that when God created us in his image, he made us to communicate something about himself. So while we are not God, much like our selfies are not really us, what we are reflects something true about God. So the next time you sit at dinner and take that selfie of you and your hamburger, or the next time you put your arm around your loved one and want to “selfifie” the moment, think of what the picture is doing. It is your image making something known about you.

And then put your phone down and look at the other people around the table, or turn your face toward that loved one you just had your arm around, and see that what they are and who they are communicates something true about God, who made them in his image.

I hope you find this video helpful as you seek to faithfully teach God’s word this week.

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